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Diet and Nutrition

Rice and Black Bean Pilaf

It is frequently difficult to eat a healthy, nutritious meal at the workplace, especially one that is low in fat and heart-healthy. Each work day we are faced with this challenging task, and too often we settle for meals high in fat and calories, which seem appealing even when we are not that hungry. Therefore, it is of upmost importance that we think about the types of foods we are consuming before we consume them.

Rice and Black Bean Pilaf is a great way to incorporate many different nutrients for the working individual in one, heart- healthy dish. This recipe provides a tasteful combination of black beans, which are an excellent source of protein, and fiber-rich rice pilaf. When added to an array of vegetables that provide additional nutrients and antioxidants, this healthy, delicious meal will make you the envy of the breakroom!

Ingredients

Directions

Place rice and chicken broth in a saucepot and bring to a boil. Reduce heat and cook rice, covered, until tender and all the liquid is absorbed, 30 to 35 minutes. Remove from heat, uncover, and fluff with a fork. Heat the oil in a large sauté pan over medium-high heat. Add onions and cook until onions are soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add garlic, oregano, celery, carrot, cumin and chili flakes and cook, stirring occasionally, until carrots are tender but not mushy, about 6 minutes. Stir in black beans and cook until just warmed through, about 1-2 minutes. Combine onion-black bean mixture and hot rice in a serving bowl and toss to combine.

Garnish with parsley.

(1 serving equals 1 1/2 cups pilaf). Total Calories 310; Total Fat 6 g; (Sat Fat 1 g, Mono Fat 3.5 g, Poly Fat 1 g) ; Protein 11 g; Carb 57 g; Fiber 8 g; Cholesterol 0 mg; Sodium 290 mg

 

 

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Last Reviewed: Sep 09, 2013

James H Swain, PhD, RD, LD James H Swain, PhD, RD, LD
Assistant Professor of Nutrition
School of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University